100 Years Evolution Of Lingeries

100 years evolution of lingeries

100 Years Evolution of Lingeries

100 years of evolution of lingeries. Ladies have been wearing sexy underthings way before Victoria ever had a secret. The article will showcase how lingerie has evolved over the last 100 years, and it’s very clear that the definition of “sexy” has changed over time, too. This article 100 years the evolution of lingeries features an example of unmentionables from every decade, starting in 1915 when billowy boy-shorts were the fashion de la bedroom. Best Lingerie in 1925 constituted what looks like a full outfit, complete with slip, robe, and a string of pearls. So fancy! The ’40s brought about the cone-shaped bra and snug corset that created the hourglass shape so popular among Old Hollywood actresses, and babydoll shirts with frilly undies were all the rage only ten years later. By 1985, lingerie started getting more familiar. The 2015’s style can’t be limited to just one body type. From demurely natural to the heightening of sexuality, lingerie has come a long way over the last century. Beginning with the simple white skivvy of the early decade, lingerie transitions to silkier looks and the revealing of more skin.

Let’s have a compelling and accurate look at what styles were most alluring and desirable at different points in time. Most importantly, lingerie isn’t restrictive to a single body type – It is what women of all shapes and sizes make a beautiful appearance.

 

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So let’s Begin 100 years evolution of lingeries

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Over the decades, seduction replaced elegance. Lingerie became one of the fashion industry’s leading products, with pieces accentuating female embellishment, sensuality, and beauty. These items of clothing were not only a means of feeling seductive but were also a functional addition. Seamless styles were introduced and by the end of the 1990s, lingerie favored the blatant over the intimate.

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Evolution of Lingerie over 100 years

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  • The 1900s

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The S-curve corset of the early 20th century was designed to minimize the waist while pushing the bust forward and the derrière backward.

 

 

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  • The 1910s 

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In 1910, plagued by the woes of restrictive whalebone corsets, socialite Mary Phelps Jacobs (also known as Caresse Crosby) invented the first bra by sewing two handkerchiefs together a ribbon tie. Four years later, she was granted a patent for her genius design.

 

 

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  • The 1920s

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With the ’20s, the desired figure took a turn from buxom to boyish. Women started to wear loose, shapeless silhouettes—and big boobs and butts just got in the way. As the clothing became less covered-up, undergarments had to shrink accordingly. In place of bloomers and full-length base layers, flimsy slips came into play. The trend of the time was to wear stockings rolled down to just below the knee, about where modern hemlines hit. That way, if you’re feeling risqué, you could flash a glimpse of your kneecap. 1925s was the time of living that easy, breezy bloomers life. An example of a wedding-night chemise from the mid-1920s. Girdles and corsets still existed in the ’20s, just in a different form. The purpose of the new style was to slim and flatten hips for a more androgynous figure, instead of the ultra-curvy silhouette that had been popular in decades prior.

 

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  • The 1930s

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Like the fashions of the 1930s, the lingerie returned to a more feminine aesthetic. The girdles became shorter…And the bras less constraining—though still minimally supportive, for the most part. The ‘Full Fashion Double Support’ bra was introduced for fuller-busted women, featuring an extended band for added support in the year 1933.

 

 

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  • The 1940

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Special corsets were designed for women in the Auxiliary Territorial Service and Women’s Auxiliary Air Force during WWII. The standard uniforms only had pockets in the jacket, which women frequently took off, so corsets with built-in pockets were created to give ladies a place to hold their change. During World War II supply shortages, women would paint on seams down the back of their legs to give the illusion of stockings. It was S. H. and Company that first denoted cup size and band measurement in a 1932 ad. This method was adopted by Warner’s and quickly became the industry standard in 1944. Underwire bras had been introduced as early as the 1930s but failed to gain popularity among manufacturers due to metal shortages during WWII. With the war’s end, the supportive, structured style started gaining steam. The first strapless bras were invented in 1946 which gave women an alternative to bustiers and corsets when wearing revealing necklines. Frederick Mellinger—the man behind the famous lingerie retailer Frederick’s of Hollywood—pioneered the push-up bra in 1947, offering women everywhere a little extra oomph. Also in 1947, Christian Dior introduced his famous New Look (a full-skirted, nipped waist outfit), which called for a girdle to give that hourglass silhouette. Even more versatile than strapless styles, the newly introduced adhesive bra allowed for backless dresses and plunging necklines, too. The bullet bra grew in popularity during the late 1940s and quickly became the dominant style throughout the 1950s. Bra enhancers have come a long way since the stiff cone inserts that women wore in the ’40s. Invented in 1947 by Frederick Mellinger, the push-up bra gave women what they had been missing since the decline of the corset: a little aesthetic edge.

 

 

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  • The 1950s

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After the utilitarian theme of garments in the wartime 1940s, lingerie in the 1950s was 100 percent glamour. The Bra Bag created a push-up effect by way of an inflatable insert in the bra cup. Women would blow into the connected tube until they’d achieved the desired level of enhancement. Seamless nylon stockings were the mark of a well-dressed woman in the 1950s. With pin-ups like Bettie Page gaining widespread popularity, sexy lingerie, at last, became socially acceptable and more readily available by 1955.

 

 

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  • The 1960s

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 The ’60s ushered in an era of freedom and rebellion. Many women of this decade burned their bras as an act of defiance and non-conformity, and even those who didn’t still enjoy a more liberated sort of lingerie that embraced the natural female form. Lingerie in the 60s was playful and girlish with frills and bows. Dainty florals and soft pastels were hallmarks of 60s lingeries.100 years evolution of lingeries

 

 

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  • The 1970s

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lingerie and undergarments grew up a bit in the 70s. Where a girlish, youthful look had ruled the previous decade, modern styles were sleeker and more streamlined, often in silk or lace fabrications. While the cultural vibe was all about liberation, women still wanted their lingerie to offer some constraint. The control-top panties helped flatten and smooth the tummy area. No lingerie ideas would be complete without the mention of Victoria’s Secret. Roy Raymond started the undergarments-only retailer in 1977 because he felt uncomfortable shopping for lingerie for his wife in department stores.

 

 

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  • The 1980s

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Towards the end of the 70s, colors of lingeries became more bold and sultry in the 80s and styles became more provocative and hyper sensualized. In the 1980s, Frederick Mellinger would make another form of lingerie, the thong, famous by mass-marketing the garments in most of the garment stores.

 

 

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  • The 1990s

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 The popularity of the cone bra caught widespread fire in this era and became an icon of the decade. There were no limitations of sex appeal in the 90s lingeries. French cut polyester panties became loud and clear in this era. For the first time underwear was visibly worn as outfits to be boasted and not hidden. Push up bras gained prominence in this period. 1995 was the inaugural of Victoria Secret’s first fashion show which completely publicized lingeries which gave retailers a platform to raise the standards of lingeries.100 years the evolution of lingeries

 

 

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  • The 2000s

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The weirdest thing, in my opinion, was the underwear trends of the 2000s. It was like we started wearing our knickers as outerwear and decided that a flash of a bra or the peek of a thong were all sorts of chic. No longer are undergarments made from wool and whale bones. Now women can have the support of cloths, foams, gels, pads, straps, air pockets and more. And with Victoria’s Secret introducing a new fantasy bra every show, they can also have a multi-millionaire lingerie set covered in the precious gemstone. At $15 million, the Red Hot Fantasy Bra worn by supermodel Gisele Bundchen in 2000 is the most expensive lingerie in the world.100 years the evolution of lingeries

 

 

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  • The 2010s

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Slip dresses — previously reserved to hide panty lines underneath other frocks — now become mainstream and as chic as any other formalwear. Lace-edged camis that looked like nighties were just the ticket to pair underneath blazers, while corsets were just as acceptable to sport with jeans as a normal cotton tank top. Everything was silk, lace, and satin, and we probably looked like we barely had enough time to put on all of our clothes before leaving rumpled beds behind. If you had a sheer shirt, you didn’t have to worry about strategically hiding your bra. Instead, the point was to embrace the lacy-ness and let it shine through. Silk camis were a fancy step up from our ribbed cotton tanks usually worn underneath blazers or paired with tiered mini skirts.  Hence lingeries, also known to be the underwear has somehow become outerwears to be revealed and not to be hidden underneath in the era of 2010s. With this evolution of 100 years the evolution of lingeries, the standards of lingeries have also evolved.

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